Discrete and Process Automation

Modern Technology is Shedding New Light on Museum Artifacts

25 June 2018

In 2012, a fragment of a 9th century Latin-German dictionary known as Admonter Abrogans, was discovered in the library of Admont Abbey in Austria. Because the parchment is so old, it is kept at the abbey under glass and cannot be handled by human hands regularly.

Researchers from the Institute of CreativeMedia/Technologies at St. Pölten University of Applied Sciences created an interactive multimedia presentation for the Admont Abbey displays, allowing museum-goers to interact with the parchment without actually touching or harming it.

The St. Pölten project is called Multi-Device Ecologies Towards Elaborate Experience (MEETeUX). It brings researchers together to develop solutions for digital forms of museum exhibitions. The work on the Admonter Abrogans is MEETeUX’s first project.

In a special exhibition, the abbey is presenting fragments of the Admonter Abrogans, a Latin-German dictionary from the period of around 800. Source: St. Pölten University of Applied Sciences/Kerstin BlumensteinIn a special exhibition, the abbey is presenting fragments of the Admonter Abrogans, a Latin-German dictionary from the period of around 800. Source: St. Pölten University of Applied Sciences/Kerstin Blumenstein

This kind of multimedia presentation allows people to zoom in on the fragments, view background info and the study, as well as display modern German translations. Users can use this technology for fun games, like attempting to translate Old German to modern German.

Smartphones, touchscreens and holograms are bringing museums into the 21st century with increased user interaction. Just like the parchment, museums can use smart devices to allow tourists to interact with books that are protected by glass enclosures. People can use smart devices to flip through books and admire more than just the pages that are being displayed under glass.

"For a meaningful and integrated future use of smartphones, tablets and touch screens or modern media technology such as augmented and virtual reality in semi-public areas, for example, exhibitions and museums, there are currently no well-tested concepts for the design of interaction and user experience for end users", explained Markus Seidl, head of the MEETeUX project as well as the Institute of CreativeMedia/Technologies at St. Pölten UAS. "Smartphones could be used as a 'magic lens' like a magnifying glass. As soon as one is near a station, certain information could also be played automatically as a 360-degree-video or audio presentation; or exhibition visitors can work together with collected objects and information to solve a puzzle.”



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