Medical Devices and Healthcare IT

Multiphoton Microscopy Monitors Chronic Wound Healing

05 December 2018

Chronic skin wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, pressure wounds and other chronic skin wounds affect more than 6 million people in the U.S. alone, with the cost of treatments mounting to $25 billion each year. The current standard of care requires removing a small piece of the wound tissue for laboratory analysis under a microscope, but disturbing tissue around the wound can be disruptive to the healing process.

Recognizing a lack of non-invasive diagnostic biomarkers to monitor such wounds, University of Arkansas Optical redox ratio of the wound edge changes over time. In vivo redox ratio maps of FAD/(NADH+FAD) were generated from the normalized fluorescence intensities. Source: University of ArkansasOptical redox ratio of the wound edge changes over time. In vivo redox ratio maps of FAD/(NADH+FAD) were generated from the normalized fluorescence intensities. Source: University of Arkansasresearchers have identified a biomarker to track changes in cellular metabolism as wounds transition through the healing process. The group applied multiphoton microscopy to acquire a 3D image of wound structure and its metabolism.

Images of wound tissue metabolism were captured using two key molecules in normal cellular metabolism: nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). NADH and FAD naturally absorb and emit light from the laser beam of a microscope, enabling measurement of these materials in tissue through a calculation known as the optical redox ratio.

Trials of the non-destructive monitoring process were conducted with diabetic and control mice. Images that documented metabolic activity in wounds were recorded for 10 days, revealing metabolic incongruities between the two groups as wounds healed. Due to changes in the optical redox ratio and amount of NADH, the researchers concluded that the dividing cells in diabetic mice remained at the wound edge and did not migrate over the site to restore the skin’s protective barrier.

The research demonstrating the utility of this high-resolution, non-invasive autofluorescence imaging method is published in Communications Biology.

To contact the author of this article, email shimmelstein@globalspec.com


Powered by CR4, the Engineering Community

Discussion – 0 comments

By posting a comment you confirm that you have read and accept our Posting Rules and Terms of Use.
Engineering Newsletter Signup
Get the Engineering360
Stay up to date on:
Features the top stories, latest news, charts, insights and more on the end-to-end electronics value chain.
Advertisement
Weekly Newsletter
Get news, research, and analysis
on the Electronics industry in your
inbox every week - for FREE
Sign up for our FREE eNewsletter
Advertisement
Find Free Electronics Datasheets
Advertisement