Acquired Electronics360

Medical Devices and Healthcare IT

Video: Non-Invasive Implantable Neural Interface Based on Silicon Electronics

19 July 2017

If successful, this noninvasive flexible multielectrode array could alter the lives of people with hearing and visual impairments and neurodegenerative diseases. Image credit: Ken Shepard/Columbia UniversityIf successful, this noninvasive flexible multielectrode array could alter the lives of people with hearing and visual impairments and neurodegenerative diseases. Image credit: Ken Shepard/Columbia UniversityThe invasive nature and large size of available implanted electrode devices for brain stimulation prompted Columbia University researchers to explore options for an improved brain-machine interface. Backed by a four-year $15.8 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the engineers are designing an implantable brain-interface device at the scale of one million channels to enable recording and stimulation from the sensory cortex.

“We think the only way to achieve this is to use an all-electrical approach that involves a massive surface-recording array with more than one million electrodes fabricated as a monolithic device on a single complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit. We are working with the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company as our foundry partner,” says Ken Shepard, professor of electrical engineering.

The degree of noninvasiveness required for human use can only be achieved within this aggressive four-year time frame with electrode architectures based on stimulation and recording at the brain surface. The team contends this can be realized by exploiting the full capabilities of leading-edge CMOS technology, together with the industry’s associated manufacturing capabilities, and by using monolithic integration of stimulation/recording electrodes with an underlying CMOS electronics platform.

The implanted silicon chips are ultra-conformable to the brain surface and flexible enough to move with the tissue. The array is equipped with wireless powering and data telemetry.

Researchers from Baylor College of Medicine, California Institute of Technology, Duke University, New York University, Northwestern and Medtronic are also participating in the program.

To contact the author of this article, email sue.himmelstein@ieeeglobalspec.com


Powered by CR4, the Engineering Community

Discussion – 0 comments

By posting a comment you confirm that you have read and accept our Posting Rules and Terms of Use.
Engineering Newsletter Signup
Get the Engineering360
Stay up to date on:
Features the top stories, latest news, charts, insights and more on the end-to-end electronics value chain.
Advertisement
Weekly Newsletter
Get news, research, and analysis
on the Electronics industry in your
inbox every week - for FREE
Sign up for our FREE eNewsletter
Advertisement

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Date Event Location
30 Nov-01 Dec 2017 Helsinki, Finland
23-27 Apr 2018 Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
18-22 Jun 2018 Honolulu, Hawaii
Find Free Electronics Datasheets
Advertisement