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Two New Sensor Technologies Support "Next-Generation" Temperature Measurement

24 November 2016

Melexis has announced two new sensing technologies for simplified integration of temperature measurement into applications that enhance safety, efficiency and convenience.

Melexis' MLX90640 infrared (IR) sensor array offers a cost-effective alternative to high-end thermal cameras. Image source: Melexis.Melexis' MLX90640 infrared (IR) sensor array offers a cost-effective alternative to high-end thermal cameras. Image source: Melexis.Citing the device's high resolution and its ability to operate reliably in harsh environments, Melexis positions the MLX90640 infrared (IR) sensor array as a cost-effective alternative to more expensive high-end thermal cameras. The company considers the 32 × 24 pixel device to be a good fit for such safety and convenience applications as fire prevention systems, smart buildings, intelligent lighting, IP/surveillance cameras, HVAC equipment and vehicle seat occupancy detection. It has a –40° C to 85° C operational temperature range and measures object temperatures between –40° C and 300° C.

Maintaining high levels of precision across its full measurement scale, the device delivers a typical target object temperature accuracy of ±1° C. Melexis also touts the array's noise performance, with a noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of just 0.1° K RMS at a 1Hz refresh rate.

Unlike microbolometer alternatives, the MLX90640 does not need frequent re-calibration, thus ensuring continuous monitoring and lowering system cost. Field-of-view options comprise the standard 55° × 35° version and a 110° × 75° wide-angle version. The device is supplied in a compact, four-pin TO39 package incorporating the requisite optics. An I²C-compatible digital interface simplifies integration.

The MLX90342 quadruple thermocouple interface—designed to meet the need for more stringent automobile engine and exhaust thermal management and control—is capable of measuring extreme temperatures with high accuracy. Image source: Melexis.The MLX90342 quadruple thermocouple interface—designed to meet the need for more stringent automobile engine and exhaust thermal management and control—is capable of measuring extreme temperatures with high accuracy. Image source: Melexis.The MLX90342, simultaneously being announced by Melexis, is a quadruple thermocouple interface that provides rapid response and very high levels of accuracy when measuring extreme temperatures. It has been specifically designed to allow automotive designers to address the need for more stringent engine and exhaust thermal management and control. This need is being driven by the higher temperatures associated with new, smaller and more efficient engine designs. Target applications include turbo charger temperature control and temperature monitoring of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), selective catalytic reduction (SCR), diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), and diesel/gasoline particle filtering systems.

With a –40° C to 155° C operating temperature range, the MLX90342 supports a –40° C to 1,300° C thermocouple temperature range. On-board cold junction compensation and linearization, plus factory calibration, deliver an intrinsic accuracy of ±5° C at 1,100° C.

Housed in a miniature 26-pin, 6 mm × 4 mm QFN package, the sensor interface has a rapid refresh rate of 50 Hz for high-speed response. Temperature data can be transmitted via a SENT (single-edge nibble transmission) Revision 3 digital interface, while extensive diagnostic capabilities monitor the health of the sensor and interface. Integrated fault-detection mechanisms also help sensor system designs conform to the latest vehicle exhaust regulations.



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Discussion – 1 comment

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Re: Two New Sensor Technologies Support "Next-Generation" Temperature Measurement
#1
2017-Jun-01 10:23 PM

These seem like overkill. I'm curious where an infrared camera sensor would be used in a car. Are these used to locate animals such as deer in front of the car?

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