Acquired Electronics360

Industrial Electronics

Researchers Discover Nanoparticles Could Allow for Faster and Better Medicine

20 November 2017

Gold nanoparticles could make drugs act more quickly and effectively, according to new research conducted at the State University of New York at Binghamton.

Nanoparticles are microscopic particles that are bigger than atoms, but smaller than what the eye can see. They are unique for the large surface area-to-volume ratio and their fairly ubiquitous nature. The new study is the first of its kind to look deeper into these nanoparticles in the health industry.

A new study, co-conducted by Binghamton University Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering Amber Doiron, is one of the first of its kind to look deeper into these nanoparticles in regards to health. Source: Binghamton UniversityA new study, co-conducted by Binghamton University Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering Amber Doiron, is one of the first of its kind to look deeper into these nanoparticles in regards to health. Source: Binghamton University

"Nanoparticles are a huge area of research in the scientific community right now. However, they're not yet well understood for their impact on human health," said Amber Doiron, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Binghamton University. "Nanoparticles have unique properties and, because of that, are used in many applications. They're in your food and may get into your bloodstream through environmental exposure. Eventually, they may be used for helping to get drugs to tissues or as imaging agents. We wanted to investigate how nanoparticles interact with human cells."

Doiron and her team looked specifically at the effects that gold nanoparticles have on the health of a cell. They found that nanoparticles can change cells, but only if the articles are a very specific size.

"The nanoparticles have to be around 20 nanometers. Nothing bigger or smaller worked," said Doiron.

Their research found that when the cells that arteries or veins are exposed to these nanoparticles, the vascular permeability changes. This could potentially help in more effective medication delivery.

But the researchers are also aware of some limitations of nanoparticles being used in this way.

"It has to be exact, otherwise changing the permeability of veins too much could be extremely dangerous," said Doiron.

This study was published in Nanotoxicology and was published on September 8. The paper can be accessed here.

To contact the author of this article, email Siobhan.Treacy@ieeeglobalspec.com


Powered by CR4, the Engineering Community

Discussion – 0 comments

By posting a comment you confirm that you have read and accept our Posting Rules and Terms of Use.
Engineering Newsletter Signup
Get the Engineering360
Stay up to date on:
Features the top stories, latest news, charts, insights and more on the end-to-end electronics value chain.
Advertisement
Weekly Newsletter
Get news, research, and analysis
on the Electronics industry in your
inbox every week - for FREE
Sign up for our FREE eNewsletter
Advertisement

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Date Event Location
26-28 Feb 2018 Nashville, TN
23-27 Apr 2018 Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
22-24 May 2018 Los Angeles, CA
04-07 Jun 2018 Boston, MA
06-08 Jun 2018 Los Angeles, CA
Find Free Electronics Datasheets
Advertisement